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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
st century civil rights agenda with education, choice, voting rights, and prison reform as its foundation. no one's life should be ruined because of a youthful mistake. no one should be thrown in prison for years and decades when they haven't hurt anyone but themselves. no one should lose their voting rights because they spent time in prison. it does us no good to create jobs for young people in detroit if they can't later get such jobs because of an out-of-control war on drugs. mandatory minimum sentences that force judges to give 10, 20, sometimes 50 year sentences for drug offenses are crazy and they've got to end. it is a human tragedy. it is an idea of justice. and there need to be new voices from either party that will say it's time to change. this is whay i've joined with democrats on this. [applause] i've joined with democrats on this. i'm working with senator leahy from vermont to try to give junls more freedom, more leeway when it comes to sentencing. if it were your kid would you want to know whether it was their first crime? whether there's a chance to rehabilitate
rights of all americans. in addition economic freedom, we have to have a 21st century civil rights agenda with education, choice, voting rights and prison reform. no one life should be ruined because of a youthful mistake. no one should be thrown in prison for years and decades when they haven't hurt anyone but themselves. no one should lose their voting rights because they spent time in prison. it does us no good to create jobs for young people in detroit if they can't later get such jobs because of out of control war on drugs. they should be able to vote and have a life and build a family. their children should look at what comes from happiness and hard work. we talk about the family unit owing down the drain, and we are preventing families from going back. we must address the federal mindset that values arrest rates. >> if it were your could, would there be a chance to be rehabilitating them. it is a health problem and will not get better in prison. would you want to know that there might be other solutions? they should get back into society. they should be able to get a job. they shou
civil rights agenda with education, choice, voting rights no one life should be ruined because of a youthful mistake. no one should be thrown in but themselves. no one should lose their voting rights because they spent time in prison. it does us no good to create jobs for young people in detroit if they can't later get such jobs because of out of control war on drugs. .... they should be able to vote and have a life and build a family. their children should look at what comes from happiness and hard work. we talk about the family unit owing down the drain, and we are preventing families from going back to the. we must address the federal mindset that values our rest rates. it is not because white kids in affluent suburbs are not also smoking pot, it is they tend to be arrested and do not have as good representation and the police gravitate there because it is easier. it has been going on for a long time. it is not a purposeful racism, but we have a racial return on the war on drugs that is not fair. minority communities are easy targets. some say that is good politics. maybe it
of something the civil rights leader when he said we may have arrived on these shores in different ships, but we're all now.e same boat what's going on in this town is that too often, the two parties, you think they're from different countries. they view the other side as the nemy, not the fell blow citizens with whom they occasionally disagree. but in the long run, they have he sate fate, interests in common. we have to reconcile our differences, not accentuate them. but we forget we come from a common country and common a common nd for sure destiny. final thing i say, this is something that no labels is working to overcome. in this city today, what all of do every section is forge principle compromise, the word compromise, back in the dale, my father's time, that was statesmanship. today it's a act of betrayal. your don't work with party 100% of the time, you're ostracized, there's something wrong with you. you can see this on cable tv and a variety of other things. i'll finish by recounting words that lyndon johnson, a master legislator, said once. e grew up poor in the hill country
the respect he had for judge pryor, i knew mr. pickering who had really been a pioneer for civil rights in the state of mississippi in the 1960's and 1970's when it was hard to be. the truth was the majority of democrats said, we're going t to -- we're going to block 10 of the bush judges. never been done before, but we're going to do it with a cloture vote. well, madam president, as you can guess, everyone on the republican side in the majority then got very excited. and the majority leader, senator frist, said, we're going to change the rules, do something that senator lott, a majority leader once said, was the nuclear option. and there was great consternation. senator reid said -- he recounts this very well in his book -- in 2006, he said, to do so would be the end of the senate. i made two speeches, madam president. i suggested, well, this is a terrible thing to do. a president ought to have an up-or-down vote on his circuit judges. so why don't we see if we can't get a few republicans and a few democrats and just take it out of the hands of the leaders and agree that we'll only use
person. the disabled people of america are fighting hard for our civil rights. nelson mandela has done a lot of work things considered for things like slavery. we have a topic similar. you are not entitled to the minimum wage here in america. we are specifically exempt. we are so inspired by the work of nelson mandela, we try to continue in that legacy. we want to make it so that our people, our disabled people, are no longer trapped in these workshops. host: why the blind exempt from the minimum wage? caller: the fair labor standards act of 1938 specifically exempts us. the idea is that disabled people are supposed to be inherently less productive. we are less than people. there are a lot of explanations. some people think they are doing by employing disabled people at a penny an our. it is exploiting us. whenever go on to real productive life. we are pushing hard to try to get that change. we want to be able to earn minimum wage for our work, or not work at all. disabled people have the the cassidy to be -- have the thatity to make the change nelson mandela made. host: thank you for
't been discouraged by how hard it has been because stuff that is worth it is always hard. civil rights movement was hard. giving women the right to vote, that was hard. >> subcommittee will come to order. we will begin a round of questioning. i will start that off. my first question will be for mr. abrams. you note in your written testimony that one manner in which claims become complex because the va error. cases that disorder often appealed angry man had. often more than once further increasing the complexity of the claim procedurally. number one, can you elaborate on the common errors which causes claims to be more complex due to va error on appeal? and number two, to think greater focus on appeal and remanded claims would assist va learning from it mistakes and making less of these types of errors in the future? >> yes, i can. let me give you an example. suppose a veteran files a claim for pts d. the veteran alleges that he suffered a stress the next goes to combat. the veteran service records show a combat
and changes to underperforming k-12 schools. governor malloy has called education the civil rights issue of our time, and he'll talk about his agenda at a forum of the american enterprise institute beginning at 1:30 p.m. eastern here on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies this 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: and best selling author tom standage has a new book out, and it's called "writing on the wall." tom standage, what do cicero and twitter have in common? >> guest: well, the idea of the book is that social media is a very old idea. we think that it's recent and only people alive today have ever done it. but really what i'm arguing is there's a very long and rich tradition of social media that goes back to the era of cicero, so that's the first century b.c., and the point is that you don't need a digital network to do social media. if you have one, it goes faster, but you could actually do it in the old days. cicero did it with papyrus rolls and ore members -- other members of the roman elites were linked to him and al
for mobile justice and civil rights work. there is so much more here. he was an adviser to secretary of state condoleezza rice. when i first met him, the council of the department of state he's a member of the president's intelligence advisory board and he was for president bush and president obama and he has written a number of books. germany unified. statecraft is a good one. he wrote that with condoleezza rice and most importantly he is a member of the aspen strategy group that he directed from 2,000 to 2003. i will sort by asking michele and fill up a few questions and then i will open up to the audience. we are in a transitional period for american defense strategy. are there lessons? thathat is a build down from lat summer of the pentagon. are there lessons in earlier periods in history that can help guide us now? >> what don't you answer that question. >> good afternoon everyone. it's wonderful to see so many familiar faces around the table. i do think there are some lessons to be learned from our history in terms of periods like this where we are coming out of a period of war and we a
up icing, i'm reminded of something the civil rights leader said when he said, we may have arrived on these shores in different ships, but we're all in the same boat now. what's going on in this town is that too often, the two political parties, you would think they were from different countries. they view the other side as the enemy, not as foul citizens. we have interests in common. we've got to reconcile our differences, not accentuate them. we forget we come from a common country with a common heritage, and for sure a common destiny. final thing i would say, and this is something that no labels is working to overcome, in this city today what all of you have to do every session in your state legislatures, forge principle compromised. the word cover my switchback in the day my father son used to be viewed as that's an act of statesmanship. today it is used as an act of betrayal. if you don't vote with your party, joe manchin was saying, 100% of the time, you are ostracized. there's something wrong with you. you can see this on cable tv. so i'll just finish by recounting some word
. >>> the senate judiciary committee chairman patrick leahy will deliver a speech on thursday on civil liberty, national security, and human rights. you can see the remarks live at 1:15 eastern on c-span2. >>> as you walk in, there are tables in front with a bunch of pamphlets. prior to entering the gun show. about how the government is trying to take away the guns and obama is doing this and obamacare is terrible. and so those are the guys i wanted to talk to. they were quites with the leaflet. the ideas. so i said to them, like, is this your stuff? and yeah, who are you? i'm academic. i'm a researcher and i'm doing a research on these organizations. these ideas trying to understand the guys. and i study men who believe this stuff. and they looked at me suspiciously and asked me question. and i said, look, here is what i am. i don't get it. so what here is my job. i want to understand how you see the world. i want to understand your world view. it is -- look, you will not convince me. ly not convince you. that's off the table. what is on the table i want to understand why you think the way yo
human rights first. he'll talk about balancing national security and civil liberties. that starts at 1:15 eastern here on c-span2. >> i didn't get the idea for the dummies series. i had an idea to do a beginning book about computers, about it specifically. i kind of inspired myself to do that u just daling with people in the magazine editing job i had had. being on the radio at that time. and being out in the public and talking to people about computers. it was obviously that people wanted to learn more but that the material we had available at the time just wasn't doing the job. we had beginner box on how to use computers. but they sucked. they just didn't have that, you know, they were condescending. they were pate nice. the author was arrogant. well, you'll never get the stuff anyway or iowa, look, this is cool. people didn't want to know that. they wanted to use a computer. they planned to publish one book, and even then there was some reluctancy with the title when the owner found out they had this book. he's like you can't offend the reader. cancel that book. and unfortunately, w
think mats comply civil underway, a to does not answer to work is going on right now. there's a question in the significant issues are in the midwest due to a variety of factors. in addition to rely on the midwest, the midcontinent iso in the states we need to stay closely involved. >> do you feel like epa is listening to you on these issues because i do because in 2011 when they put out their rule, they include a consultative role for ferc if someone needs a fifth year. i believe that includes not just a fifth year for retrofit but also -- and not just for retrofit but also as they need to figure to bring transmission and before the plan can retire. we voted out a policy statement of how we would handle those. we haven't gotten them yet because it's not far enough along in the process. >> they tell us they're listening to us a lot. sometimes we don't think they are. >> i am very grateful that it comes all the meetings and i'vee a commitment from them that they will continue. but it's something that needs close vigilance. >> i was going to ask you about your priorities. i felt like mr. w
civil society here around the world and everybody in this room. we should feel just as strongly as defending human right activist whether they are in egypt, russia, china, vietnam nam or any other country who are persecuted for religious beliefs or personal beliefs. these are rights we take for advantage. we should not hesitate to speak up when those rights are violated. i have met some activist who have been subjected to brutal y brutality, isolation, torture. and i am in awe by their courage and spirit and by the fact they never give up. we have a responsibility to support them. when they are in prison, this is something democrats and republicans set aside party labels, join together and work for their release. here at home, we have yet to fully recover from the effects of the 9-11 attacks. we continue to mourn the losses of innocent lives that day. we do remain vigilant against the threat of fume future attacks. but we cannot ignore it damage done by the policies put in place after 9-11. before 9-11 i doubt any of us could imagine torture, something members in both congress
of the criminal defendants are introducing at trial is showing up in the civil commitment proceeding as a basis for keeping them in prison longer. if i torp ask you to raise your right hand. most of you might be able to do those. you might refuse. you can do so. why? because you have the capability of deciding toen gauge in action. is it right to say because i can describe genetically and neurologically your behavior and casual contribution to your behavior you don't have the ability to make choices about the behavior? well, that seems to be the theory that criminal defendants are introducing with they come to the criminal cocourtroom. they're saying t not voluntary. i explained how thin the concept of voluntary criminal law. we don't define it. are we just sleepwalking through life? it times to be what a lot of criminal defendants are saying. they are acting out of reflects and con polings. you can look at your family history and see if other people had been likely to do so. like wise, incompetency cases is showing up a lot. the idea is a same kind of involuntary more often with neurological.
in this way. >> i follow on exactly from the comments of the right honorable member and her reminiscence but also her mild remonstrance, which is absolutely well made, that we are talking here about a politician. certainly in the civil encounters with president mandela in one capacity, and with mr. mandela post-presidency in other capacities, not only was his sense of humor telling, but so was the self-deprecating use to which he put that humour, lest there was any thought that a political halo could be bestowed upon him. he certainly did not want that, and he would not want that to be part of his legacy today. i mention humor because my first introduction to nelson mandela was far from fortuitous. he was then president, and enormous numbers of parliamentarians had somehow all descended on south africa at the same time. they had come from new zealand, australia, here, ireland, france all on fact-finding missions. it was interesting that these fact-finding missions all coincided with the rugby world cup that was taking place in south africa. given that there were more visiting foreign pol
to describe what's going on. because that's part of the problem. so i don't see it as a civil war. i see it as -- i see it as what happens when a party is out of power, and there isn't one unifying voice. if i ask you guys right now, you are knitting over there, who is the leader of the republican party today? [inaudible] >> he's my friend. i would tell him he got one person in new hampshire. [inaudible] >> who do you think is the leader of the party? >> it isn't jon boehner. he has no control over the pulpit or even in the senate look at ted cruz. ted cruz wouldn't say mitch mcconnell is the leader by any means. i think it's just so loose and -- i would like to process a chris christie. >> that's the point. if i went around the sherman act and as everybody who the leader of the republican party is, either we get no answers or 40 different answers. so when you don't have somebody that sets the standard, sets the tone, this happened. people start talking. you start sounding a little dysfunctional like you're suffering from multiple -- multiple personality disorder. that is happening to re
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)